Aging Brains: Fewer Neurons or Other Things?

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Clinical Neuropsychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Neuroscience, Research Methods.

Description: What were you told about the cells in the human brain and aging? That our neurons die off as we age and are not replaced? That we have the most neurons we are ever going to have at birth and things go downhill from there? Well if so, it may be time to rethink… Read more »

Executive Functions in Alzheimer’s: Brain Pacemakers Might Help

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Chronic Illness, Clinical Neuropsychology, Consciousness, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging, Stress Coping - Health.

Description: Alzheimer’s main impact is on peoples’ memories, right? Well, we can debate the depth of impact of the various features of the disease but it is the case that more than memory is affected. Specifically, the array of frontal lobe functions involving various aspects of what is called Executive Function (thinking, reflecting, planning and… Read more »

Will EQ Make You Rich? (or at least get you better payed)

Posted by & filed under Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Industrial Organizational Psychlology, Industrial Organizational Psychology, Intelligence, Social Cognition, Social Influence, Social Psychology, Student Success, The Self.

Description: I wrote in general terms about Emotional Intelligence or EQ in the previous blog to this one (http://wileypsychologyupdates.ca/general-psychology/eq-what-is-it-should-you-get-more/). Even if you do not look through psychology research literatures you have probably heard the term EQ and you have probably heard references to the many many things about work life and career success that EQ… Read more »

Improve Your Exam Performances by Thinking Metacognitively

Posted by & filed under Cognitive Development: The Information-Processing Approach, Consciousness, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Industrial Organizational Psychlology, Industrial Organizational Psychology, Intelligence, Learning, Motivation-Emotion, Student Success, The Self.

Description: Think about the last time you went into an exam feeling like you had the material down tight and were going to do well on the exam. How did you actually do on that exam? If you did not do as well as you thought you were going to do going in what did… Read more »

Creativity, Development and Aging

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Child Development, General Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intelligence.

Description: What makes something creative? The answer to THAT question is complicated and uncertain despite decades of reflection in Psychology. But sidestepping that question for the moment think about this: What would make young children more creative than teenagers or adults? Are their brains less “committed” to typical question answers? Are they simply more open… Read more »

Age of Majority/Maturity? 18!?? How do we know?

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Cognitive Development: Piagetian and Vygotskian Approaches, Consciousness, Development of the Self, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Neuroscience, The Self.

Description: The age of majority is 18 where I live, 19 where I grew up and 21 in some other jurisdictions. This is the age at which one can drink legally, vote, and other things. It is also the age at which the local justice system starts to treat you as an adult and to… Read more »

Teen Risk-taking: Biology and ?

Posted by & filed under Aggression, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Research Methods.

Description: So we all know that teenagers are reckless right? By that, we mean that teenagers take more risks in their day-to-day lives when making decisions about what to do compared to younger and older people. There is not a lot of debate about this and usually we ascribe this observation to biological/developmental causes such… Read more »

Brain Cohesiveness During Information Processing: Individual Differences and Aging Effects

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Aging-Psychological Disorders, Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging.

Description: Over time, research into what happens in the brain as humans age has moved beyond looking at issues related to the loss of specific neurons or areas of the brain as a result of things like stroke damage and begun to look in more complex manners at how the various regions of the brain… Read more »

Does Brain-Training Work? A Meta-Analysis Says Only Specifically

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, General Psychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Learning, Legal Ethical Issues, Memory, Research Methods, Research Methods in ADA, Research Methods in AP, Research Methods in ChD, Research Methods in CP, Research Methods in SP, Stress Coping - Health.

Description: You have no doubt noticed some of the many claims in the media about the possibility that playing brain-training games can improve your general cognitive functioning. Many of these claims include statements to the effect that research has proven that their game or games do in fact have a positive influence on people’s cognitive… Read more »

Social Anxiety and Acts of Kindness: An Optimistic Intervention?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Anxiety OC PTSD, Clinical Neuropsychology, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intervention: Adults-Couples, Neuroscience, Stress Coping - Health, Stress: Coping Reducing, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: Some people experience high levels of anxiety when they have to engage socially with other people and with the world in general. What sorts of things do you think might help reduce their tendency to avoid social interaction? Think of these three possibilities that were tested in a research article discussed in the linked… Read more »