Predicting Potential Terrorists: Option or Ethical Pit?

Posted by & filed under Development of the Self, Human Development, Legal Ethical Issues, Social Psychology.

Description: Can Psychology figure out how to predict who will and who will not become a terrorist? Do you think we could do this in Psychology? What would we look at in the way of predictors? What sorts of ethical considerations might arise? Source: Who Will Become a Terrorist? Research Yields Few Clues, Matt Apuzzo,… Read more »

Grit, not IQ, Predicts School Success

Posted by & filed under Human Development, Intelligence, Intelligence-Schooling, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Motivation-Emotion.

,Description: Angela Duckworth is to be a seventh-grade math teacher. Based on her experiences in trying to figure out why some students did well and others struggled in her classes when she found it very sparse intelligence did not seem to predict performance she decided to go back and get her doctorate in psychology and… Read more »

Autism Diagnosis and Culture: Context or Difference?

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Classification Diagnosis, Clinical Psychology, Disorders of Childhood, Disorders of Childhood, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Uncategorized.

Description: I’m not sure what your impression is, but if you’ve had some class discussion or have done some reading in relation to the process of diagnosing autism and young children then think for a minute about how such a diagnosis proceeds. What would you think of the suggestion that some of the core diagnostic… Read more »

Talking to Children About Terrorist Acts

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Death and Dying, Families and Peers, Human Development, Stress Coping - Health.

Description: Given the number of terrorist incidents occurring worldwide it is not surprising that a common question that parents ask of child psychologists involves wondering how to talk to their children about these global events particularly given the detailed coverage they are receiving. The article linked below involves interviews of the number of child development… Read more »

Memory in Alzheimer’s Disease and Light Therapy

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Clinical Neuropsychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging.

Description: The most poignant symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is the loss of previously consolidated long-term memories. The search is on for therapies that will, in particular reduce the impact of this particular symptom of the disorder. Read the article linked below for an overview of the way fiber-optic or light therapy may have a positive… Read more »

Eugenics and Forced Sterilization in Your Community?

Posted by & filed under Assessment: Intellectual-Cognitive Measures, Clinical Psychology, Intelligence, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Legal Ethical Issues.

Description: It is often hard to see local examples of some of the historical issues that come up in relation to the earlier days of psychology or the application of concepts related to psychology to the general population. The idea that it made sense from a social policy perspective to create a mechanism whereby “mentally… Read more »

Electronic Pacifiers for Difficult Infants?

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Early Social and Emotional development, Families and Peers, Intervention: Children and Adolescents.

Description: Parents of difficult infants and young children sometimes use television as a way of calming the children down when they become difficult to manage. Given the wide availability of other forms of electronics such as iPads what might you predict about their use by the parents of difficult infants and children? Source: iPads Often… Read more »

Bilinguals’ Expanding Developmental Advantages

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Early Social and Emotional development, Human Development, Language Development, Language-Thought.

Description: There is pretty solid research evidence showing the cognitive developmental advantage among children who learn more than one language. More recent research, some undertaken by the author of the article linked below, looked at the relationship between being bilingual and the development of social skills. Before reading the article think a bit about what… Read more »

Mental Illness and Parent Blaming: Here We Go Again??

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Early Social and Emotional development, Genetics: The Biological Context of Development, Human Development, Legal Ethical Issues, Neuroscience, Psychological Disorders, Schizophrenia.

Description: Psychologist Oliver James, in a recently released book entitled Not in Your Genes: The Real Reason Parents Are Like Their Children (2016), argues that there is no evidence for the claim that genetics plays any sort of role whatsoever in core disorders such as schizophrenia or manic-depression. The article linked below points out some… Read more »

Your Brain on a New Sport

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Health and Prevention In Aging, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Neuroscience, Successful Aging.

Description: Exercise is good for your brain. Well there is a no-brainer! Of course maintaining healthy fit lifestyle is good for all aspects of your physiological functioning but the research discussed in the article linked below takes a much more specific look to this question and indicates that exercise alone is not optimal. Read the… Read more »