Used to be we worried about TV time but now it is Screen Time that has us in a knot!

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Child Development, Early Social and Emotional development, Families and Peers, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Learning, Motivation-Emotion.

Description: Back when I was a child (a loooong time ago) one of the biggest parental concerns was whether or not they should limit the amount of time we spent watching television. After a couple of decades of research it was decided that the amount of television watched mattered partly because of what was watched… Read more »

Psychology Research and The Transition to Post-Secondary Developmental Pathways

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Child Development, Cognitive Development: Piagetian and Vygotskian Approaches, Cognitive Development: The Information-Processing Approach, Development of the Self, General Psychology, Health Psychology, Human Development, Student Success.

Description: In discussing one of the courses I developed a couple of years ago (a dual credit course for high school students focused upon the psychology of student transition and adjustment to post-secondary developmental pathways) I often found myself consistently pointing out that Psychology as a discipline is uniquely situated to provide insight and opportunities… Read more »

Postpartum OCD: Beyond a “simple” hyper-vigilance of new parenthood

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Adult Development and Aging, Anxiety OC PTSD, Child Development, Clinical Psychology, Early Social and Emotional development, Families and Peers, Health Psychology, Human Development, Intervention: Adults-Couples, mental illness, Neuroscience.

Description: You have likely heard that the baby-blues or post-partum depression is a very real issue and concern. This is true. Postpartum depression is very much a form of real depression that is triggered by the hormonal and circumstantial changes associated with giving birth. Recognizing its signs and symptoms and treating it as we would… Read more »

Moral Enhancements: Is ‘Fixing Criminals’ Viable and a Good Idea?

Posted by & filed under Aggression, Altruism Prosocial Behaviour, Clinical Neuropsychology, Clinical Psychology, Moral Development, Motivation-Emotion, Neuroscience.

Description: Hypothetically, if there were a way to change the brains or the brain chemistry of criminals in order to ‘make them more moral’ would that be a good idea? Should we try it out? Maybe do not answer Yes or No to this question but, rather, think about what else you would like to… Read more »

Social Impact of Facebook: Some of it is Quite Positive!

Posted by & filed under Altruism Prosocial Behaviour, Death and Dying, Families and Peers, Interpersonal Attraction Close Relationships, Motivation-Emotion, Social Influence, Social Psychology, Stress Coping - Health.

Description: Perhaps you have heard about concerns about ways in which Facebook and other social media sites can potentially contribute to social isolation (as they do not involve “real social face-to-face connections”). While there IS research supporting this concern can you think of situations and ways in which Facebook could, in fact, have exactly the… Read more »

Helping Others Cope with Test Anxiety: Knowing and Managing Your Advice

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Consciousness, Families and Peers, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Stress, Stress Coping - Health, Student Success.

Description: If you are an undergraduate student you hopefully have strategies in place that work to help you reduce stress and anxiety as big exams or presentations loom. So what advice would you offer to the parents of high school students about ways the parents can help their children not only manage anxiety but learn… Read more »

Age of Majority/Maturity? 18!?? How do we know?

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Cognitive Development: Piagetian and Vygotskian Approaches, Consciousness, Development of the Self, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Neuroscience, The Self.

Description: The age of majority is 18 where I live, 19 where I grew up and 21 in some other jurisdictions. This is the age at which one can drink legally, vote, and other things. It is also the age at which the local justice system starts to treat you as an adult and to… Read more »

SES and Academic Success: The Importance of Early Vocabulary

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Child Development, Cognitive Development: The Information-Processing Approach, Human Development, Language Development, Language-Thought, Student Success.

Description: Children raised in low socioeconomic status (SES) families do not do as well in school as children from high SES families. Why do you think that might be the case? You should be able to generate a long list of possible hypotheses. Perhaps the schools they go to are not as well supplied or… Read more »

Theory of Mind in Preschoolers: What’s in the Brain?

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Child Development, Cognitive Development: Piagetian and Vygotskian Approaches, Cognitive Development: The Information-Processing Approach, Human Development, Learning, Neuroscience, The Self.

Description: We know that preschoolers have trouble with (but are quite cute about) their understanding of other people’s thoughts, especially when other people’s thoughts are different than their own. If you show a 3.5 year old that a box of smarties (they are like M and M’s but are British/Canadian) contains short golf pencils rather… Read more »