Transgenerational Indian Residential Schools Experiences and Suicidal Ideation: Symptom or a Causal Challenge?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Child Development, Consciousness, Cultural Variation, Depression, Health Psychology, Indigenous Psychology, Psychological Health, Research Methods, Stress: Coping Reducing.

Description: In my previous post (http://wileypsychologyupdates.ca/general-psychology/child-development/indigenous-psychology-and-the-role-of-culture-in-psychologcial-development-and-adjustment/) I talked about the role of culture in Psychological development and adjustment and the role of culture in the discipline of Psychology. While I am planning to move away from suicide and suicidal ideation as my focus on understanding the role of aboriginal and metis culture in individual development… Read more »

Aging Brains: Fewer Neurons or Other Things?

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Clinical Neuropsychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Neuroscience, Research Methods.

Description: What were you told about the cells in the human brain and aging? That our neurons die off as we age and are not replaced? That we have the most neurons we are ever going to have at birth and things go downhill from there? Well if so, it may be time to rethink… Read more »

Are Client Status/Outcome Assessments Problematic or Necessary?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Intervention: Identifying Key Elements of Change, Legal Ethical Issues, Research Methods, Stress Coping - Health, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: In my previous post (http://wileypsychologyupdates.ca/general-psychology/abnormal-psychology/should-clinical-psychologists-routinely-assess-client-status-and-outcomes-or-do-they-already/) I discussed and provided an article link to the issue of whether clinical psychologists should (be required to) routinely objectively assess the status (wellbeing) and outcomes of their clinical clients. One of the arguments against having clients complete a status assessment prior to each therapy session is that the… Read more »

Should Clinical Psychologists Routinely Assess Client Status’ and Outcomes? Or do they already?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Classification Diagnosis, Clinical Assessment, Clinical Psychology, Intervention: Identifying Key Elements of Change, Legal Ethical Issues, mental illness, Psychological Intervention, Research Methods, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: Clinical Psychologists who are involved in providing therapy to people have a number of ethical standards to which they must adhere (you can download the Canadian Psychological Association Code of Ethics here: https://www.cpa.ca/docs/File/Ethics/CPA_Code_2017_4thEd.pdf) . One of those standards states that practicing psychologist should “Strive to provide and/or obtain the best reasonably accessible service for… Read more »

Treating PTSD: Something About Horses

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Anxiety OC PTSD, Assessment: Self-report Projective Measures, Clinical Neuropsychology, Intervention: Adults-Couples, Intervention: Identifying Key Elements of Change, Neuroscience, Prevention, Psychological Disorders, Research Methods, Stress, Stress Coping - Health, Stress: Coping Reducing, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: Two posts ago I talked about and posted links to a general article about PTSD – about its signs and symptoms and about its treatment, in general terms. In that article the two main approaches to treatment were described as medication and talk therapy. Both approaches most certainly fall in the domains of accepted… Read more »

Researcher Bias, Facillitated Communication and Ouija Boards: Quite a Combination

Posted by & filed under Clinical Psychology, Consciousness, Disorders of Childhood, Human Development, Legal Ethical Issues, Research Methods, Research Methods in ADA, Research Methods in AP, Research Methods in ChD, Research Methods in CP, Research Methods in SP, Social Psychology, The Self.

Description: This could be a Criminal Minds script. A physician sees 2 infants from the same family in his sleep laboratory. Both showed signs of sleep apnea and shortly after discharge from the lab they each die of what is certified as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, part of which may be linked to prolonged apnea… Read more »

Eurocentric Bias in Psychology: Remembering Joseph White

Posted by & filed under Assessment: Intellectual-Cognitive Measures, General Psychology, Intelligence, Intelligence-Schooling, Legal Ethical Issues, Research Methods, Social Psychology, Stereotype Prejudice Discrimination.

Description: You may not have known of Joseph White, a psychologist who died recently, but you should know about what he spent his life trying to do. White spent much of his career and life pointing out that the core theories within the discipline of psychology were blindly eurocentric. By this he meant that the… Read more »

What’s Wrong? … “Nothing”!! Changing the Conversations Between Parents and Teens

Posted by & filed under Emerging Adulthood, General Psychology, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Moral Development, Research Methods, Social Cognition, The Self.

Description: Think about this either based on personal experience or hypothetically. A teenager goes to school in the morning seeming rather relaxed and happy. At the end of the day they return home quiet (sullen) and clearly distracted. When one of their parents asks what is up they respond “nothing” in a grumpy tone and… Read more »

Stress and Exercise: Research on their relationship and reading that research are complicated

Posted by & filed under Motivation-Emotion, Research Methods, Stress, Stress Coping - Health, Stress: Coping Reducing, Student Success.

Description: Given the time of year/term (mid-November) and if you are a secondary or post-secondary student you are likely just coming out of a mid-term exam period or you are just beginning to contemplate the end of the term assignment and exam demands. So, it is likely your stress levels are a bit elevated. Do… Read more »