Rapid Onset Gender Dysmorphia: Research Issues and Challenges

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Child Development, Classification Diagnosis, Clinical Assessment, Clinical Psychology, Gender-Role Development Sex Differences, Legal Ethical Issues, Psychological Disorders, Sexual Disorders Gender Dysphoria, Stress Coping - Health, The Self, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: Gender Dysphoria is a diagnostic category in the DSM-5. You can find a description and the diagnostic criteria here: https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/conditions/gender-dysphoria . The question of what sorts of variables contribute to an individual of one sex having feelings that they are actually another sex (and yes, I realize that speaking of sex in a binary… Read more »

Vegetative States and the Grey Zone: Neuroscience Raises Needs for Ethical and Legal Reflection

Posted by & filed under Clinical Neuropsychology, Consciousness, Legal Ethical Issues, Neuroscience.

Description: Do you know what to means to say someone is brain dead or to say that someone is in a vegetative state? If you see or hear a news story about someone being in a vegetative state what do you think that person’s future looks like, or do you think they really do not… Read more »

Are Client Status/Outcome Assessments Problematic or Necessary?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Intervention: Identifying Key Elements of Change, Legal Ethical Issues, Research Methods, Stress Coping - Health, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: In my previous post (http://wileypsychologyupdates.ca/general-psychology/abnormal-psychology/should-clinical-psychologists-routinely-assess-client-status-and-outcomes-or-do-they-already/) I discussed and provided an article link to the issue of whether clinical psychologists should (be required to) routinely objectively assess the status (wellbeing) and outcomes of their clinical clients. One of the arguments against having clients complete a status assessment prior to each therapy session is that the… Read more »

Should Clinical Psychologists Routinely Assess Client Status’ and Outcomes? Or do they already?

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Classification Diagnosis, Clinical Assessment, Clinical Psychology, Intervention: Identifying Key Elements of Change, Legal Ethical Issues, mental illness, Psychological Intervention, Research Methods, Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

Description: Clinical Psychologists who are involved in providing therapy to people have a number of ethical standards to which they must adhere (you can download the Canadian Psychological Association Code of Ethics here: https://www.cpa.ca/docs/File/Ethics/CPA_Code_2017_4thEd.pdf) . One of those standards states that practicing psychologist should “Strive to provide and/or obtain the best reasonably accessible service for… Read more »

Applying Classic Psychology Experiments to Leadership and Life

Posted by & filed under Altruism Prosocial Behaviour, General Psychology, Industrial Organizational Psychlology, Industrial Organizational Psychology, Legal Ethical Issues, Persuasion, Social Cognition, Social Influence, Social Psychology, Social Psychology, Stereotype Prejudice Discrimination.

Description: What makes a Psychology experiment a “classic”? Well perhaps that s too broad a question but, in truth, “classic” psychology experiments, even, or perhaps especially, the ones that would not get through an ethic panel review today can cause us to reflect upon some important issues and variables in our lives. Think about what… Read more »

Cranky, Crabble People: Maybe Surgical Brain Tuning Possible?

Posted by & filed under General Psychology, Legal Ethical Issues, Motivation-Emotion, Neuroscience, Personality, The Self.

Description: You have very likely heard the story of Phineas Gage, a tale often told in introductory psychology classes to introduce a discussion of functions related to various portions of the brain and to the executive control functions related to the frontal lobes in particular (if not there is a section in the linked article… Read more »

Researcher Bias, Facillitated Communication and Ouija Boards: Quite a Combination

Posted by & filed under Clinical Psychology, Consciousness, Disorders of Childhood, Human Development, Legal Ethical Issues, Research Methods, Research Methods in ADA, Research Methods in AP, Research Methods in ChD, Research Methods in CP, Research Methods in SP, Social Psychology, The Self.

Description: This could be a Criminal Minds script. A physician sees 2 infants from the same family in his sleep laboratory. Both showed signs of sleep apnea and shortly after discharge from the lab they each die of what is certified as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, part of which may be linked to prolonged apnea… Read more »

Criminal Brains: Opportunties and ethical pitfalls of looking beyond minds

Posted by & filed under Altruism Prosocial Behaviour, Child Development, Clinical Neuropsychology, General Psychology, Human Development, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Legal Ethical Issues, Moral Development, Motivation-Emotion, Neuroscience, Personality, Personality Disorders, Psychological Health.

Description: Have you ever watched an episode of the TV show Criminal Minds which fictionally focusses on the activities of an FBI behavioral analysis unit that hunts psychopaths? In the show there are many discussions of the sorts of developmental histories that amplify some psychopathic behavioral tendencies and of the sorts of things that can… Read more »

Can you undo ‘fake news’ when its in your head?

Posted by & filed under Aggression, General Psychology, Intelligence, Intelligence-Schooling, Language-Thought, Learning, Legal Ethical Issues, Motivation-Emotion, Persuasion, Social Cognition, Social Psychology, Social Psychology.

Description: Ah politicians are a never-ending source of possible research topics! Assuming you have not been successful in selectively ignoring any political news from south of our border (and if you have please tell us how, as long as it does not involve a lobotomy or copious amounts of alcohol!) then you have heard about… Read more »

Scaring Babies for Science: But Ethically This Time

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Child Development, Intervention: Children Adolescents, Learning, Legal Ethical Issues, Psychological Intervention.

Description: If you have had an introductory psychology course you have likely learned something about phobias. Phobia’s are usually described as irrational fears. Learning theorists (John Watson foremost among them) argued that phobias are learned when a situation or object or animal is associated with a fear inducing stimulus such as an unexpected loud sound…. Read more »