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Description: Despite the media putting heavy emphasis on the depression of the Germanwings pilot who is believed to have crashed his plane on purpose just what are the work implications of depressi0on? Can people work through or with depression? This article and audio file link (on the article webpage) discusses these issues.

Source: National Public Radio: Working Through Depression: Many Stay on the Job, Despite Mental Illness

Date: April 12, 2015

Working through depression

Links:    http://www.npr.org/2015/04/12/398811515/working-through-depression-many-stay-on-the-job-despite-mental-illness

Can or should people work when they are struggling with depression? Many do not have a choice. Recent alarm about the issue of pilots and depression and other aspects of mental health have created a media discussion that is often not well grounded in research data. This article and the related audio recording of the NPR itself looks at a few sides of these questions.

Questions for Discussion:

  1. What are the impacts of depression on work?
  2. Should employees disclose their depression to their employers? Might the answer to this vary according to circumstances and if so what are those circumstances?
  3. How might Psychology and psychological (clinical) research inform these issues?

References (Read Further):

Simon, G. E., Barber, C., Birnbaum, H. G., Frank, R. G., Greenberg, P. E., Rose, R. M., … & Kessler, R. C. (2001). Depression and work productivity: the comparative costs of treatment versus nontreatment. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 43(1), 2-9. http://moodle.adaptland.it/pluginfile.php/20623/mod_data/content/40737/2001_Simon.pdf

 

Brohan, Elaine, Claire Henderson, Kay Wheat, Estelle Malcolm, Sarah Clement, Elizabeth A. Barley, Mike Slade, and Graham Thornicroft. (2012) Systematic review of beliefs, behaviours and influencing factors associated with disclosure of a mental health problem in the workplace.” Bmc Psychiatry 12, no. 1 11.

http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-244X-12-11.pdf

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