A Soon Post-COVID (Small, Thin) Silver Lining?

Posted by & filed under Adult Development and Aging, Consciousness, Development of the Self, Emerging Adulthood, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Human Development, Stress Coping - Health, Student Success, The Self.

Description: OK, I realize deeply and fully that we are most definitely NOT even close to being ready to consider even the thinnest of possible silver linings to the COVID debacle. So, just put that aside for now (I will hint at it very cautiously at the end of the second section below) and let’s… Read more »

How Might You Test for Wisdom?

Posted by & filed under Assessment: Intellectual-Cognitive Measures, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Personality, Successful Aging.

Description: Are you wise (not as in wise guy but as in wise like an owl)? What does wisdom involve? What sorts of things, if you observed them in the behavior of, or otherwise applying to, a particular person would lead you towards thinking that they were a wise person? Now think of this as… Read more »

When or How Might Mis-remembering be Good?

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Sensation-Perception.

Description: Imagine you are chatting with one of your grandparents about a trip you took with them last summer and you are reminiscing about a stop you made at a bakery, and they are saying they still remember the taste of the peanut butter cookie they had while you were there. In thinking about that… Read more »

Reactivating Stem Cells: Possbile Key to Treating Neurodegenerative Disorders

Posted by & filed under Clinical Neuropsychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging, Physiology, Research Methods.

Description: When I first started teaching introductory psychology a few decades ago I used to tell students that they had most of the largest number of brain neurons they would ever have at the time they were born. After their birth the number of brain cells dropped due to things like attrition and pruning (neurons… Read more »

This is Your Brain on Lonely

Posted by & filed under Clinical Neuropsychology, General Psychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Interpersonal Attraction Close Relationships, Neuroscience, Social Perception, Social Psychology, The Self.

Description: Being lonely is not an enjoyable experience and in many ways that I suspect you are aware of or could guess at, it is not good for you either. But how does prolonged loneliness effect your brain and why might it be useful and important to know how loneliness impacts people’s brains? Think about… Read more »

Pattern Separation and Human versus Animal Intelligence

Posted by & filed under Consciousness, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intelligence, Language-Thought, Learning, Memory, Neuroscience.

Description: What do you know about how memory works? You likely have a basic understanding of how information comes in through or senses (via a very short term sensory store), pauses in working memory (if we work on it) and perhaps eventually gets processed into long term memory. Does that take you bac to a… Read more »

The Psychology of Covid-19: Schooling and Cognitive Health

Posted by & filed under Child Development, Group Processes, Health and Prevention In Aging, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intervention: Children and Adolescents, Student Success.

Description: I do not have a fully developed professional Psychological opinion as yet on the question of whether or how schools should re-open in the (soon) coming fall. Some aspects if such an opinion will, of course, involve vital matters of health-related safety; will students get sick, if so, how sick, and will they infect… Read more »

Literacy and Dementia: Think About It!

Posted by & filed under Abnormal Psychology, Aging-Psychological Disorders, Health and Prevention In Aging, Health Psychology, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Language-Thought, Neuroscience.

Description: Here is a somewhat backhanded test of your current understanding of factors relating to rates of dementia in elder individuals. What would you predict about the comparable rates of depression among otherwise similar groups of literate and illiterate elderly individuals? If you think there will be a rate difference between these two groups what… Read more »