Memory: Introverts Versus Extroverts

Posted by & filed under Memory, Personality, Research Methods, Social Influence, Social Psychology.

Description: Think about this statement. Extroverts have better memories than Introverts. If you were to find a study (and there is a link below to a description of just such a study) that showed a correlation between scores on the personality dimension of Introversion/Extroversion you could just take the statement at face value (e.g., yes,… Read more »

Nobel Prize Baseball: Thinking, Fast and Slow Goes to the Show

Posted by & filed under General Psychology, Language-Thought, Learning, Memory.

Description: Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky (both psychologists) won the Nobel Prize in economics for their work on biases in human decision making in 2002. More recently, Kahneman wrote a book entitled Thinking, Fast and Slow in which he describes, in detail, the different systems we use when we are thinking quickly and “instinctively” as… Read more »

Reactivating Stem Cells: Possbile Key to Treating Neurodegenerative Disorders

Posted by & filed under Clinical Neuropsychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging, Physiology, Research Methods.

Description: When I first started teaching introductory psychology a few decades ago I used to tell students that they had most of the largest number of brain neurons they would ever have at the time they were born. After their birth the number of brain cells dropped due to things like attrition and pruning (neurons… Read more »

Investigator Lies and False Confessions: A Deeper Look

Posted by & filed under Legal Ethical Issues, Memory, Motivation-Emotion, Persuasion, Social Psychology, Social Psychology.

Description: Sometimes an individual who has confessed to a crime recants or withdraws their confession. What comes to mind when you read that sentence? Knowing nothing else about an individual case, what would you estimate is the likelihood that the person recanting a confession is actually guilty of what they origin ally confessed to? Now… Read more »

Psychology of COVID-19: Contact Tracing and Human Memory

Posted by & filed under General Psychology, Health Psychology, Legal Ethical Issues, Memory, Persuasion, Research Methods, Social Psychology, The Self.

Description: Think back over the past 10 days and then itemize everything you did, everywhere you went, everyone you saw, interacted with, for how long and how far apart were you during that interaction? Include every place or situation you encountered over that same period that involved groups of people. How many people? How close… Read more »

Pattern Separation and Human versus Animal Intelligence

Posted by & filed under Consciousness, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intelligence, Language-Thought, Learning, Memory, Neuroscience.

Description: What do you know about how memory works? You likely have a basic understanding of how information comes in through or senses (via a very short term sensory store), pauses in working memory (if we work on it) and perhaps eventually gets processed into long term memory. Does that take you bac to a… Read more »

Fixing the Pain of Broken Hearts with a Drug: The Psychology of Memory Re-consolidation

Posted by & filed under Memory, Motivation-Emotion, Neuroscience, Stress Coping - Health, Stress: Coping Reducing.

Description: Perhaps not the best topic for Valentine’s day but the fact is some relationships end and some end badly with the former participants struggling to come terms with heartache. Heartache is a very general term, one which has a lot of poetic weight but what does it involve Psychologically and how might it be… Read more »