Remembering Music and Forgetting Everything Else?

Posted by & filed under Consciousness, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Intervention: Adults-Couples, Memory, Neuroscience.

Description: Quick! Which of these is easier to remember: a song you heard last week and really liked or what you had for lunch last Tuesday? Unless the lunch was particularly good or unique or special it is most likely you would remember the song and if you think about it you agree with that… Read more »

Stuff to Remember? Sleep On It!

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Memory, Neuroscience, Stress Coping - Health, Stress: Coping Reducing, Student Success.

Description: Decades ago, when I was in grade 7, we had grade-wide exams in a number of subjects. I was particular keen to do well on the science exam. One of the topic areas on the exam was the periodic table and I set out to memorize the names, symbols and atomic numbers of all… Read more »

Getting Lost While Grocery Shopping

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Clinical Neuropsychology, General Psychology, Memory, Neuroscience.

Description: The two (same chain) large grocery stores near my neighbourhood have been undergoing renovations over the past 2 months. In both cases this has involved changes in the layout of each store and the relocation of where particular things can be found. I used to know both of these stores well. I could easily… Read more »

When or How Might Mis-remembering be Good?

Posted by & filed under Basic Cognitive Functions In Aging: Information Processing Attention Memory, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Sensation-Perception.

Description: Imagine you are chatting with one of your grandparents about a trip you took with them last summer and you are reminiscing about a stop you made at a bakery, and they are saying they still remember the taste of the peanut butter cookie they had while you were there. In thinking about that… Read more »

Memory: Introverts Versus Extroverts

Posted by & filed under Memory, Personality, Research Methods, Social Influence, Social Psychology.

Description: Think about this statement. Extroverts have better memories than Introverts. If you were to find a study (and there is a link below to a description of just such a study) that showed a correlation between scores on the personality dimension of Introversion/Extroversion you could just take the statement at face value (e.g., yes,… Read more »

Reactivating Stem Cells: Possbile Key to Treating Neurodegenerative Disorders

Posted by & filed under Clinical Neuropsychology, Health and Prevention In Aging, Higher-Order Cognitive Functions in Aging, Memory, Neuroscience, Physical Changes In Aging, Physiology, Research Methods.

Description: When I first started teaching introductory psychology a few decades ago I used to tell students that they had most of the largest number of brain neurons they would ever have at the time they were born. After their birth the number of brain cells dropped due to things like attrition and pruning (neurons… Read more »

Investigator Lies and False Confessions: A Deeper Look

Posted by & filed under Legal Ethical Issues, Memory, Motivation-Emotion, Persuasion, Social Psychology, Social Psychology.

Description: Sometimes an individual who has confessed to a crime recants or withdraws their confession. What comes to mind when you read that sentence? Knowing nothing else about an individual case, what would you estimate is the likelihood that the person recanting a confession is actually guilty of what they origin ally confessed to? Now… Read more »